Saturation Index Panel

Panel Description Tests Included Cost
Saturation Index Gives and assessment of your water's tendency to form lime scale or if it will tend to be corrosive to plumbing alkalinity, calcium, hardness(calcium & magnesium), pH, specific conductivity $55

The required sampling protocol and amount of water required to run the test is listed below. Click the designated sampling protocol to view it in PDF form.

Water Required: 1 Quart
Sampling Protocol: Standard Protocol

pH (Acidity)

The pH of water is a measure of how acidic it is. A pH of 7.0 is neutral. Higher values indicate alkaline water; lower values indicate acidic water. On the average, water with a pH between 6.5 and 8.5 will probably not cause problems. However, the more alkaline the water is, the more likely it will be to have a "lime scale" build-up in the plumbing, especially if the water is hard. The more acidic the water is, the more likely it will be to cause metallic tastes, stains (blue-green from copper; orange-brown from iron), and corrosion of metal components of water systems. Water neutralizing systems are available. If your water is acidic, please refer to the enclosed Acidic Water Information sheet

Recommended Level:
6.5 - 8.5

Specific Conductivity (Salinity)

Specific conductivity gives an indication of how high the mineral content of the water is , which could indicate potential problems requiring further analysis. Highly mineralized water can cause problems with water stills, boilers, radiators, and filters, and can cause a mineral build-up on cooking utensils and spotting of glassware. The health effects of highly mineralized water depend upon the minerals present and their concentrations. Very high levels have a cathartic reaction and do not quench thirst. To make an approximate conversion to Total Dissolved Solids, another commonly used measure of mineral content, multiply the specific conductivity value by 0.62. If your water has a high mineral content, please refer to the Highly Mineralized Water Information sheet.

Recommended Limit:
900 μmhos/cm @ 25°C

Hardness (Calcium, Magnesium)

The hardness test primarily measures the Calcium and Magnesium content of water and reflects the degree of difficulty one can expect in using non-detergent soaps. The harder the water, the more soap is required to overcome the effects of the hardness. High hardness at alkaline pH's can also result in the formation of lime scale in pipes, cookware, and appliances, especially in hot water heaters. A conventional water softener usually remedies the problem. However, persons on restricted sodium diets should be aware that water softeners can significantly increase the sodium content of water.

Recommended Level:
No recommended limit has been set by the EPA.

Alkalinity

Alkalinity is a general term used to represent the amount of bicarbonate, carbonate, and hydroxide present is a water supply. It can combine with calcium in the water to form lime scale (calcium carbonate). It also serves to help keep water from changing pH too easily. For these reasons, it is useful to know the amount of alkalinity in a water supply for preventing lime scale, and keeping pools and spas stable. Alkalinity is one of the factors needed for calculation of the saturation index. There are no major adverse health effects to consuming water containing the usual amounts of alkalinity found in most drinking water, and no limit has been established for alkalinity in public water supplies.

Calcium

Calcium is a major contributor to water hardness. There are no major adverse health effects to consuming water containing the usual amounts of calcium found in most drinking water, and no limit has been established for calcium in public water supplies.

Magnesium

Don't confuse Manganese (Mn) with Magnesium (Mg).
Magnesium is a contributor to water hardness. There are no major adverse health effects to consuming water containing the usual amounts of magnesium found in most drinking water, and no limit has been established for magnesium in public water supplies.

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail