Chemical Sampling Instructions

Depending on what you are testing for, you will need to collect your sample in one of two ways listed below. You can check by finding your panel in our Price List. Select your panel from that page to view its required sampling protocol and amount of water.

Standard Protocol

This protocol is used for most analytes.

  1. In most cases, the preferred sampling point is a tap as close to the well as possible, and prior to any water conditioning equipment. Exceptions would be:
    • If your purpose is to check whether conditioning or filtration equipment is functioning properly. In that case yo ushould run enough water to assure that the sample you collect is fresh from the conditioning equipment (2-5 minutes depending on the distance from the equipment).
    • If you wish to determine if any metals are entering the water from plumbing during normal operating conditions. If this is the case, run sufficient water to approximate normal usage conditions.
  2. The best wellhead sampling protocol is to flush the well for about fifteen minutes. This insure that the sample is representative of the water coming into the well.
  3. For most panels the sample bottle should be at least one quart in size. We recommend you use one of our bottles. If you use your own bottle, it may be either plastic or glass, but must not have a metal lid. Rinse it out with the well water 2-3 times and fill it to within one inch of the top. Label the bottle "Flushed Sample."
  4. Bring the samples to the laboratory as soon as possible. If too much time elapses, chemical changes might take place in the samples that will give inaccurate results (pH changes, iron or lime precipitation, nitrate assimilation by organisms, etc.) If transit time will be more than a couple of hours, refrigerate samples. Payment is expected when the sample is submitted.

 

Plumbing Contamination Protocol

This protocol is used when checking for contamination from plumbing (copper, lead, iron, zinc, or other heavy metals).

  1. Allow the water to sit in the pipes for 6-16 (overnight) without being used.
  2. Collect a quart of the first water to come out of a household faucet that is fed by the longest run of interior plumbing you have. This sample will be used for analysis of metals contributed by the plumbing system (copper and lead in most cases; zinc, iron, and other metals by request). Label this bottle "Unflushed Sample".
  3. If other tests are being run as well, you may also need to collect a quart sample according to the Standard Protocol above.
  4. Bring the samples to the laboratory as soon as possible. If too much time elapses, chemical changes might take place in the samples that will give inaccurate results (pH changes, iron or lime precipitation, nitrate assimilation by organisms, etc.) If transit time will be more than a couple of hours, refrigerate samples. Payment is expected when the sample is submitted.

 

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